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Uh oh. I think my wallet might hate this. Right now my preference is Marpat (though I recently got some multicam on sale). This forest A-TACS could be a nice option for VA...
 

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Yeah im still in acus and like the marpat colors more. But atacs is the future. Cost to adopt is the issue.
 

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I think it's pretty neat but it's not enough to make me ditch my multicam just yet.
 

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Tactical Tailor now sells one of their hats in ATACS, maybe it's a sign they will dabble in it in the future.
 

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ATACS in greens looks pretty good. But I still love marpat greens
 

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I can't really see the benefit of A-TACS. It might be OK for snow melting dry areas or specific deserts. The FG will probably be an improvement.
 

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It's so dependent on where you are. A-TACs would probably own in the dry parts of the Mid East and desert SW US where everything is already tan and brown. The FG would be better in lush and jungle environments like Central and South America and parts of the north in non-winter conditions.
 

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There is a principle in the visual arts of seeing truth rather than perception. The first thing an elementary drawing or painting student has to do is learn to see the actual proportions and colors of a familiar scene, rather than what he has always thought he was seeing. Most people drastically overestimate the amount of green in nature. Nature is brown.

The beauty of A-TACS, like Multicam, is its chameleon quality. Observe standard A-TACS in a variety of lighting conditions and backdrops, and it will look different. More gray in bright, arid environs, more ruddy and earthy when surrounded by those colors, and the green elements in their standard pattern come out when you view it amdist underbrush or fields. Multicam does the same thing.

That said, I like A-TACS over Multicam because it has not only that chameleon quality but also a unique nested structure that creates visual confusion at almost any range. It conceals, yes, but even at close range, it causes the eye to strain in identifying the outline of the camouflaged person. You can positively identify the camouflaged target, and be looking directly at him, and still it takes a few precious moments to make sense of what you're seeing.

That quality in combination with a very effective color pallette inclines me toward A-TACS, and yes, I do believe the original A-TACS is as close as you'll come to a universal pattern. I think the overt green elements in Multicam are largely extraneous. They at best serve to simulate overlaid fronds of vegetation. In an urban environment those are absent, and in a natural environment, nature provides them for real. The job of the camouflage pattern is to use the predominant color themes of the backdrop in such a way as to disguise the shape of the subject, and to that end, animals use exclusively shades of brown and gray. Even in the midst of a lush forest in Tennessee or Virginia, the deer and squirrels are grey-brown because the tree trunks, the leaf litter, the boulders, the dirt--in short every background color against which they may be observed is a shade of grey or brown. Even the jungle cats achieve stunning results by simulating only background pallette and shadow patterns. They don't need to simulate foliage because where covering foliage exists, it serves the grey-brown rock and the grey-brown animal equally well, and where it does not exist it is not an issue. They spend very little time floating spread-eagle over your head, silhouetting themselves against the canopy.

High fidelity simulation, such as replicating specific foliage or ground cover, is a technique for a different purpose, the ghillie-suited sniper who needs to defy close scrutiny by becoming, visually, something else entirely. No printed camouflage pattern will be able to achieve that. The camouflaged soldier only needs to defy immediate identification and acquisition through disruption of his outline and inducing visual confusion. (Not to mention that the sniper knows better than to make himself the only foliated bush amdist a stand of tall hardwoods.) For my purposes, I would confidently take original A-TACS into any environment in which I have hunted or hiked, from the deep south to the far northeast, having seen (truly seen) the colors and shapes which actually surround the hunter and hunted in those places. Does A-TACS FG have a valid purpose? Probably, in heavily under-foliated jungles where you can't see the forest for the ferns. That, however, is a specialized application. The original pattern is the universal one, believe it or not.


(The other possible use is manicured lawns. If you plan to stalk golfers in their native environment, a predominantly green pattern might serve you well.)
 

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I still think the Marines did the most efficient job. Two patterns, two different environments, and no wishy washy bullshit.
 

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(The other possible use is manicured lawns. If you plan to stalk golfers in their native environment, a predominantly green pattern might serve you well.)
Tiger... must... die... :D

I still think the Marines did the most efficient job. Two patterns, two different environments, and no wishy washy bullshit.
^^^This.^^^ ...and they did it well. As Ancient postulated, there is a lot of brown in both patterns, so they are very efficient in their environments.
 
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